December 21, 2014

Hopes for the Next 40 Years

Robert Cacioppo: It would be my hope that in the next 40 years, life along the Gulfshore would have as rich a growth in the arts as in the past 40 years. Imagine life here without our rich art scene—The Phil, Bonita Art League, Florida Repertory Theatre, Barbara B. Mann, (etc.). My second hope would be that I would still be around to create it and enjoy it all!

Denise Cobb: My hope would be that in 40 years, The Naples Winter Wine Festival will celebrate its 50th anniversary event by announcing that this will be its last one because the mission has been achieved! The commitment to support the charitable programs that improve the lives of underprivileged and at-risk children in Collier County will have been met through the completion of a sustaining endowment fund from proceeds raised over all these years from the festival. This endowment will let the Naples Children & Education Foundation continue to make a difference in the quality of children’s lives.

Todd Gates: My sincere hope is that the quality of life that has enabled Naples and Southwest Florida to become an international destination will continue to be cherished and nurtured in order for our area to be admired by all. Additionally, it is critically important that we balance a diversified economy within this goal. It is difficult, if not impossible, to achieve this quality of life without a quality job.

Frank Haskell: Looking forward, I see challenges on the horizon that I will approach as opportunities to open the way to even greater values in my life. I encourage you to remember that time is precious. There are only two dozen hours in a day, 1,440 minutes and 86,400 seconds! Do you wish to waste any of them on anger, on spite, on resentment or on despair? I urge you to spend your precious time in the days and years ahead using your ever-valuable possibilities, mindful of the positive potential that will leave an everlasting mark on your life.

Jacke McCurdy: I would hope that all the environmental projects would come to fruition and preserve the beauty of the area we live in. By then, the Naples Botanical Garden will be as much an attraction as the Buchardt Gardens in Vancouver, and the Bonita Springs Center for the Arts will be thriving.

Elliott H. Singer: The key for the next 40 years is that the city leaders do not disturb the quality of life that Naples is famous for. These leaders can improve the ingress and egress of the city’s streets, but the quality of life found in this “paradise” should not be disturbed—only enhanced.

Sandra Stilwell Silverglide: My hopes would be for us to maintain our beautiful beaches and shorelines, to be environmentally balanced with growth at the level where we can prosper, yet realize that the true beauty of our area is our environment. The thought of offshore drilling concerns me greatly. I would like to see economic diversification in Southwest Florida so we are not entirely reliant on tourism or development. I would like for residents to become more aware of green building, solar power and alternative energy sources. Lastly, I would like to see the issues of homelessness and hunger addressed.

Bruce Yamron: Congratulations to Gulfshore Life on 40 years of success! Gulfshore Life was just two years old when my parents established Yamron Jewelers, Naples, in 1972.  One might say we have grown up together. At that time, natural beauty, a warm year-round climate, spectacular sunsets, and welcoming residents and businesses made our Naples community stand out. It was a little jewel hidden in Southwest Florida. The little jewel has grown into a major treasure. Naples was “discovered.” Visitors fell in love with the community and chose to stay. Many shared their skills and resources with local leaders to achieve a transformable impact. We witnessed progress that protected nature’s priceless gifts, while people worked together to improve lives through expanded education, medical services and cultural offerings. I hope that during the next 40 years, residents will continue to enjoy life on the Gulfshore, aware that this privilege comes with the obligation to preserve and improve it for future generations. Through it all, I hope that Gulfshore Life will still help us focus on what is good and of lasting value.