October 31, 2014

November Highlights

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After a wildly successful first year in 2009, the Naples International Film Festival kicks off its second season with a Hollywood-style gala, film presentation and a chance to mingle with movie stars, directors and producers on Nov. 4 at the Phil. (Tickets are available through www.thephil.org.) Then, get ready for three days of cutting-edge movies by international filmmakers from Nov. 5–7 at Silverspot Cinemas in Mercato. For details, call 775-FILM (3456).

See It!

That lindsay goodwin likes history and has a special affinity for painting interior views is abundantly evident in this 8-by-10-inch canvas. The incredible detail of her observation on this small scale is astonishing. Goodwin has cropped her “tablescape” so that our view appears to be looking down and across the scene. We seem to be the first to have arrived in the dining room as there are no figures in the composition. The silver urn on the sideboard against the back wall establishes the depth of our vision.

Goodwin’s skill with the brush and only the correct amount of paint is obvious everywhere. She renders the light reflected by the glassware and silver with deliberate but nuanced strokes of pigment. The richly carved dark ebony sideboard animates the background with its cut curves and reinforces the glamour of the room. The woven cane back of the chair stops our gaze and suggests a place we might sit and contemplate another view of the room.

 

Tablescape at Chateau de Noizay, Loire Valley is on display at Gardner Colby Gallery.
                —Mark Ormond

 

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Commune with nature during free guided nature walks at Bunche Beach Preserve at San Carlos Bay and Matanzas Pass Preserve on Fort Myers Beach. Get the scoop on bird patrol (Nov. 13), low tide loafing at sunset (Nov. 23) and exploring ethnobotany (Nov. 24). Call 533-7440 for details and to register.

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Tony award winner Frank Langella joins the renowned Naples Philharmonic Orchestra for an evening of music, hors d’oeuvres and wine to kick off the Phil’s coming season during the Philharmonic Center for the Arts Opening Night on Nov. 6. Call 597-1900 to reserve your tickets.

 

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Everything artsy in fort Myers comes together Nov. 14 from 4–7 p.m. at the Alliance for the Arts for Taste of the Arts. Catch performances, art exhibits, food, wine and a showcase of the upcoming season from the Alliance for the Arts, ArtFest Fort Myers, Florida Repertory Theatre, Gulf Coast Symphony, the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center and the Southwest Florida Symphony. Call 332-4488 for more information.

 

Don’t Miss It!

It’s election time again, and the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers has selected a handful of politically charged two- and three-dimensional artworks for its Too Hot to Handle 2010—A Political Issues Juried Exhibit. Check them out at the gallery through Nov. 6. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information.

Twelve years ago, the curtain went up on the florida repertory Theatre’s inaugural show, Noises Off. Now in its “lucky 13th” season, the Florida Rep revisits the sidesplitting farce by Michael Frayn, onstage at the historic Arcade Theatre in downtown Fort Myers through Nov. 20. Producing Artistic Director Robert Cacioppo chats about why this production is the most-requested revival in the theater’s history.

What is Noises Off all about?
It’s about a second-rate British theater troupe putting on a farce called Nothing On. In part one, we see the show in the final rehearsal. In part two, it’s a month into the tour, and the entire two-story set flips around, so you’re seeing it from the backstage perspective as people are fighting, one of the actors is drunk and two are having an affair. Part three is the final performance where we see it from the front, but at this point, the whole show has disintegrated into one mess. I compare it to the TV show The Office, where you’re seeing the backside of a company and all of the characters’ relationships.

Why will audiences love this show?
Noises Off is one of those plays in which the audience cries with laughter. If audiences want anything, they want to escape and have a great time in the theater, and that’s what we give them.

What’s the biggest challenge in putting this production together?
The gigantic, 40-foot-wide, two-story set that has to be able to revolve completely around. It’s a real challenge for our crew to build. 

What else can we look forward to this season from the Florida Rep?
We’ll be doing two of Broadway’s hottest shows: Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps, which is still running in Manhattan, and the southeastern U.S. premiere of the Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning drama, August: Osage County. Those two are hot tickets.
                                           —Jennifer Freihofer