Favorite Things


Interior designer Renée Gaddis on the livable luxury objects she’s coveting

Fort Myers-based Renée Gaddis—known for effortlessly blending texture, tone and organic materials to convey pure magnificence—shares her favorite objects with naturalist elements.

BY February 1, 2023
Anna Karlin Dimple Lamp
(Courtesy Anna Karlin)

Anna Karlin Dimple Lamp

A furniture, object and jewelry designer, Anna Karlin uses materiality to explore concepts of physical and emotional support through her Dimple Lamp. In the nearly 2-foot-tall piece, brass-plated steel provides a solid base for the soft-looking glass, which is propped up by a marble sphere. The softly lit fixture contains a dimmable LED bulb. “Although this functions as a lamp, it is a beautiful sculpture,” Renée says. “Her designs are all amazing, but this piece just speaks to me.” 

annakarlin.com 

 

Chris Wolston Cocorocha Chair
(Courtesy Chris Wolston)

Chris Wolston Cocorocha Chair

Known for his postmodern designs and collaborations with Fendi, Dior and Philip Lim, Chris Wolston reclaims and reimagines the lost art of weaving with an anthropomorphic twist. The artist has lived part-time in Medellín since moving there after graduation with a Fulbright scholarship to study pre-Columbian ceramics in the city. Chris’ work celebrates and supports Colombian culture and artistic traditions. Cocorocha—an evolution of his popular Nalgona chair—is woven of 100% Colombian wicker, ethically sourced in the Amazon. The furnishing seems to hug the sitter with its fleshy shape and wild limbs. “This chair puts a smile on my face,” Renée says. “It is a conversation piece perfect for Florida. The charismatic nature is refreshing and fun.”

chriswolston.com

 

Lauren Williams Sculptural Fibres 044
(Courtesy Lauren Williams)

Lauren Williams Sculptural Fibres 044

Hundreds of strands of bamboo, wool and Tencel (a sustainable material made from the pulp of eucalyptus trees) cascade from a base of brass and stained oak in Lauren Williams’ tapestry. Lauren dips the fibers in buckets of dye, adding layers of color as she moves downward and embracing the drip and movement of the dye. “Her process is truly mesmerizing,” the designer says, adding that she appreciates the interactive element. “She encourages you to freely run your fingers through it as you walk by.” Unlike most of Lauren’s other works, which stretch freely across the wall, the Sculpture Fibres series—done in collaboration with the revered Thomas Hayes Studio—takes a structured approach to textile art. The piped form creates tight clusters of flowing strands. At its longest point, Fibres 044 stretches 9 feet, making it an ideal anchor for a high-ceilinged room.

laurenwilliamsart.com

 

Malene Knudsen Large Swan Vase
(Courtesy Malene Knudsen)

Malene Knudsen Large Swan Vase

Inspired by her childhood days spent collecting flowers, shells, wood and stone in the forest, Copenhagen-based ceramist Malene Knudsen masterfully blends texture, tone and shading in her minimalistic designs. The made-to-order, watertight Large Swan Vase is crafted with clay, coarse-grained firesand and crushed bricks for a rough surface. The crooked neck, with its gourd-like resemblance, is familiar and otherworldly. “All of her ceramics are very natural in color, organic in form and raw in texture,” Renée says. “Every piece is unique and perfectly imperfect.” Like nature itself.

maleneknudsen.com