Along the Gulfshore


A Window (and Doors) into Marco History

The Marco Island Historical Society has debuted a permanent outdoor art exhibit illustrating the island’s colorful past.

 

Southwest Florida is home to some of the most breathtaking beaches, exotic sea life and primitive landmarks. Visitors come from all over to spend a week in the paradise we call home. But while there are stunning sandy shores that stretch for miles, there’s also a lot of history to take in. Not the least of which lies within the city of Marco Island.

Dress Rehearsal by Merald Clark

The Marco Island Historical Society recently unveiled a dramatic, permanent glimpse into that past: outdoor gallery Windows and Doors to History. The vibrant art exhibit illustrates the 10,000 years of Marco Island history. With 20 faux windows, three faux doors and a three-panel column, museumgoers are able to peek into the life that existed before the island became a residential hot spot and tourist destination.

Each of the colorful scenes, which line the perimeter of the building, tell a beautiful tale of a moment in time that many Floridians may be unfamiliar with. From the Pre-Calusa period to the booming development era by the Mackle Brothers in the late ’60s, the gallery serves as a chronological guide for the island.

The seven artists behind these pieces display their talents through the use of colors, brush strokes and creative vision. And although every canvas is different from the next, there’s a seamless flow throughout the paintings as you make your way around the facility.

Marco's Queen Bee by Jarrett Stinchcomb

“The museum is multifaceted, with its beauty all throughout the inside and now on the out,” says Patricia Rutledge, executive director of the Marco Island Historical Society.

On a beautiful day, art enthusiasts can stroll around the building learning about paradise while enjoying it at the same time. Windows & Doors to History is much more than a striking installation—it’s a story.

 

For more information, visit themihs.com or call 642-1440.